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Regional State of the Coast Report for the Western Indian Ocean

The Regional State of Coast Report for the western Indian Ocean (WIO) is the first comprehensive regional synthesis to provide insights into the enormous economic potential around the WIO, the consequential demand for marine ecosystem goods and services to match the increasing human population, the pace and scale of environmental changes taking place in the region and the opportunities to avoid serious degradation in one of the world’s unique and highly biodiverse oceans.

The report goes a step further and presents exploratory scenarios and policy analysis to better inform anticipatory planning and management of coastal and marine resources.

Thirty years after the Nairobi Convention was enacted, there is no better way to mark this major milestone than launching this report in 2015 - a report which amongst others, will provide the Convention with the basis for reflection on where it is coming from and where it would wish to be in another thirty years from now.

Download the [FULL REPORT]


 

Date of launch: Monday, 22 June, 2015
Venue: Savoy Hotel, Mahe, Seychelles
Launch by:
Mr. Achim Steiner, UNEP Executive Director and Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations;
Mr. Didier Dogley, Seychelles Minister of Environment, Energy & Climate Change; and
Mrs. Mette Wilkie, Director, Division of Environmental Policy Implementation (DEPI), UNEP
Press release on the launch of the State of Coast report
Western Indian Ocean's Pristine Ecosystems, Valued at US $25 Billion Annually, Under Threat. - Read more
News articles related to the launch of the Regional State of Coast report and the COP8
i) Seizing the Blue Economy Approach in the Western Indian Ocean Region.
Achim Steiner Speech to Nairobi Convention COP8. - Read more
ii) Nairobi Convention's 30th anniversary: Western Indian Ocean remains largely unpolluted due to regional 'foresight' - Read more
iii) Seychelles Summit Puts Marine Wildlife In The Spotlight. - Read more
iv) Nairobi Convention: Seychelles has ‘embraced sustainability’, says UNEP Executive Director . - Read more



Download the Regional State of Coast report in parts

[TABLE OF CONTENTS]
[FOREWORD]
[PREFACE]

[ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS]
[LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS]

PART 1: SUMMARY

 

[EXECUTIVE SUMMARY] 

 

PART II – THE CONTEXT OF THE ASSESSMENT

 

[Chapter 1. PLANET: OCEANS AND LIFE] 

[Chapter 2. MANDATE AND METHODOLOGY] 

PART III – ASSESSMENT OF MARINE BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AND HABITATS

[Chapter 3. INTRODUCTION – BIODIVERSITY] 

[Chapter 4. BEACHES AND THE NEARSHORE] 

[Chapter 5. MANGROVES, SALT MARSHES AND SEAGRASS BEDS] 

[Chapter 6. CORAL AND BIOGENIC REEF HABITATS] 

[Chapter 7. INTERTIDAL AND NEARSHORE ROCKY REEFS] 

[Chapter 8. SHELF SEDIMENTS AND BIODIVERSITY] 

[Chapter 9. DEEP SEA AND OFFSHORE/PELAGIC HABITATS] 

[Chapter 10. THREATENED MARINE SPECIES] 

[Chapter 11. SIGNIFICANT SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION] 

[Chapter 12. SUMMARY ON MARINE BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY] 

PART IV – ASSESSMENT OF MAJOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

[Chapter 13. SCIENTIFIC UNDERSTANDING OF ECOSYSTEM SERVICES ] 

[Chapter 14. THE OCEAN’S ROLE IN THE HYDROLOGICAL CYCLE ] 

[Chapter 15. SEA/AIR INTERACTION ] 

 

[Chapter 16. PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION ] 

[Chapter 17. OCEAN-SOURCED CARBONATE PRODUCTION ] 

[Chapter 18: AESTHETIC, CULTURAL AND SPIRITUAL SERVICES FROM COASTAL AND MARINE ENVIRONMENTS ] 

[Chapter 19. SUMMARY ON MAJOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES ] 

PART V – ASSESSMENT OF FOOD SECURITY FROM MARINE RESOURCES

[Chapter 20. THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN AS A SOURCE OF FOOD ] 

[Chapter 21. CAPTURE FISHERIES ] 

[Chapter 22.  MARICULTURE ] 

[Chapter 23. SOCIAL ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF CAPTURE FISHERIES AND MARICULTURE] 

[Chapter 24. SUMMARY OF FOOD SECURITY FROM MARINE RESOURCES ] 

PART VI – ASSESSMENT OF OTHER HUMAN ACTIVITIES AND THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

[Chapter 25. MARITIME ACTIVITIES ] 

[Chapter 26. OIL, GAS AND RENEWABLE ENERGY] 

[Chapter 27. COASTAL MINING AND ITS INFLUENCE ON COASTLINE STABILITY] 

[Chapter 28. TOURISM AND RECREATION] 

[Chapter 29. URBANISATION, COASTAL DEVELOPMENT AND VULNERABILITY, AND CATCHMENTS] 

[Chapter 30. MARINE GENETIC RESOURCES AND BIOPROSPECTING IN THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN] 

[Chapter 31. SUMMARY OF OTHER HUMAN ACTIVITIES IN THE COASTAL AND MARINE ENVIRONMENT] 

PART VII – SCENARIOS, POLICY OPTIONS AND CAPACITY BUILDING

[Chapter 32. SCENARIOS: WIO COASTAL AND MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL FUTURES ] 

[Chapter 33. GOVERNANCE: LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORKS ] 

[Chapter 34. POLICY ANALYSIS AND OPTIONS]

[Chapter 35. COASTAL AND MARINE RESEARCH AND CAPACITY BUILDING]  

PART VIII – OVERALL ASSESSMENT

 

[Chapter 36.  OVERALL ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF THE COAST IN THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN ] 

 

 

[ABBREVIATIONS] 

[GLOSSARY]