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Faces of Mau

Wilson ole LangatFarmer and livestock herder

Wilson, 78, lives on the edge of the forest in Kapsimbeyo Village, near Olenguorone. This area is traditionally Ogiek community land. The Ogiek are an indigenous forest people, many of whom still live within the forest – but the forest has shrunk in area. Some Ogiek homesteads are now even outside the forest. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Dina Chepkirui BiiFarmer and women’s group leader

Dina, 52, lives in Sigowet village, Kericho county. A mother of seven, she farms vegetables and Napier Grass on five acres, and owns three cows. She is also the Kericho county chairlady of the Kenyan women’s group Maendeleo ya Wanawake which lobbies for women’s rights and gender equality across the country. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Alfred AbieroChief Engineer at KenGen

Hydro-electric power currently accounts for 46 percent of Kenya’s total power output. Albert works at Sondu Miriu hydro-power station. Opened in 2007, this is one of the biggest plants in Kenya. It takes water from the Sondu river, fed and nourished by the Mau eco-system, to turn its turbines without damming the river. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Hesbon ObiraFarmers Field School facilitator

Hesbon, 55, lives and works out of Lorenge Forest Station in the Northern Mau. He runs one of four Farmers Field Schools (FFS) in the area. A total of 120 farmers are taking part in regular classes facilitated by the Kenya Forest Service. Local farmers are taught eco-friendly techniques which increase crop yield and revenue. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Mary Julius SanderaBriquette-maker, farmer and women’s group leader

Mary, 59, a retired teacher, has a small farm and some livestock in Kisiriri Village, Maasai Mau. After she retired, she dedicated herself to farming fulltime and to the women’s group that she meets with once a week to produce fuel-briquettes for sale. They are made using leaves and waste paper and sell for Ksh.10 (roughly 12 US cents) per pack of three, enough to cook one evening meal for a family of six. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Loise ToroleiCharcoal producer and seller

Loise, a young mother and the main family income earner, sells charcoal at the junction in Ololulunga, near Narok town and the Maasai Mau. Loise, is part of a local association of charcoal producers who aim to use wood that is commercially farmed to burn charcoal rather than doing it illegally inside the forest. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Samuel Kipkorir KoechKenya Forest Service ranger

Samuel, 45, is one of a team of 11 foresters who are charged with patrolling the Ainabkoi forest and arresting people burning charcoal or illegally removing timber. Illegal charcoal burning is having a disastrous effect on Kenya’s forests with trees felled in a unsustainable way to clear land. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Grace BoitCommunity leader planting trees

Grace is a farmer from Kipilat village and a leading member of the forest community in Ainabkoi. Grace, works on a voluntary basis to support efforts to protect the forest. She provides both material support to Kenya Forest Service rangers and where possible gives information to the authorities on the activities of illegal loggers. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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Peter MwangiTimber truck driver

Peter, 25, is a driver who takes trucks full of timber from Ainabkoi in the area of the Northern Mau to other areas of the country where it is processed. This timber comes from legal thinning and pruning activities which helps generate income for other measures helping to conserve forests. © UNEP/Riccardo Gangale

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