Media

 

UNESCO celebrates Music and Biodiversity (January 2010)

At the UNESCO launch of the International Year of Biodiversity (IYB) on 21 January 2010, a unique and memorable biodiversity-inspired world premiere performance of the composition The Story of Earth and Water by Niels Lan Doky was held in the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle in Paris. This is a musical work integrating sounds from nature accompanied by visual images of various ecosystems. Reflecting musical biodiversity, the music suite (aside from the earth-, water- and microorganism sounds) contains a natural blend of fully integrated musical influences, such as jazz, classical, electronica, pop, soul, r&b, blues and world.
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Nairobi festivals go green for UN climate campaign

Late July, The Storymoja Hay Festival brought together the best in Kenyan and international thinkers, writers, musicians, film makers, Nobel Laureates and other luminaries to discuss and debate for 3 days. Modeled on Britain's annual and popular Hay Festival, the event is designed to be a meeting of minds in order to brainstorm for solutions on climate change, the environment, education, finance, fair trade and business. Then early August, UNEP was also involved in Blankets & Wine, Kenya's first green music festival, aiming to raise environmental awareness on the road to a global agreement on climate change in Copenhagen this December. Audience received tips on how to green their lifestyles as they listened to live performances from some of East Africa's most talented musicians.
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Rock and Jazz Festivals Tune into Climate Friendly Concerts

Hove Festival and Canal Street, two top Norwegian music festivals, have signed on to the UNEP Climate Neutral Network (CN Net). The network includes countries such as Costa Rica and New Zealand as well as cities and companies. Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary General and UNEP's Executive Director, said: "The greening of live musical events represents an opportunity to lower the carbon footprint of not only the entertainment industry, but those of millions, if not hundreds of millions of people world-wide. Unless all sectors of society step up to the bar and address this challenge, we will all be singing the blues."
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